Author Topic: one does NOT always find blame where one finds guilt.  (Read 51 times)

supreme

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 25
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
one does NOT always find blame where one finds guilt.
« on: November 15, 2017, 05:49:37 pm »
In the TROM book we read:

Quote
After the loss of a game considered serious, the loserís only
recourse is to blame the victor for overwhelming him. Thus,
blame is the assignment of responsibility for the outcome of a
game, with an implied wrongness. If the victor accepts this
blame - it too is a postulate overwhelm - he feels guilt. Thus,
blame and guilt are seen as two sides of the same coin: where
one is present you will always find the other. They are a pair,
and are quite inseparable.
However, the victor is under no obligation to accept the blame. So it is entirely possible for an overwhelmed terminal to blame the other terminal but for that terminal to not accept the blame and hence not accept the guilt.

Peter McLaughlin

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 24
  • Karma: +7/-0
  • TROM Editor
    • View Profile
    • TROM Help
Re: one does NOT always find blame where one finds guilt.
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2017, 04:53:26 pm »
Theoretically you are correct that blaming someone will not cause them to feel guilty. However i have never seen a person accused of wrongdoing who did not get defensive which indicates they felt at least a smidigeon of guilt.

David Cooke

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
  • Karma: +5/-0
  • Location: Adelaide, Australia
    • View Profile
Re: one does NOT always find blame where one finds guilt.
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2017, 07:25:05 pm »
This also relates to what Dennis later said about bondings, and double bondings, between concepts. Double bonding is when we postulate that A necessarily involves B, and B necessarily involves A so we can't have one without the other.

Beings who were completely free could conceive 'blame' and 'guilt' as ideas in isolation without reactively associating them.

But we live in a society where compulsive game play is accepted as normal, where blame and guilt are tightly double-bonded. People habitually use game strategies to make each other guilty. The mainstream media is full of stories pointing the finger of blame at someone or other, encouraging readers to get worked up against these 'guilty' ones.